Archive for 'The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book'

Mary Frances here. For Easter this year, I made my American Girl doll, Emily, the most beautiful bonnet! I used the pattern called “Infant Doll’s Crocheted Cap” (even though my doll is not an infant!) and I added a wraparound flower with a little pearl in the middle and a leaf. It is so cute!

The pattern is from “The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book: A Children’s Story-Instruction book with Doll Clothes Patterns for American Girl and Other 18-inch Dolls”.

Crow Shay here. Easter is coming and I can’t wait to show you a project from The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book 100th Anniversary Edition. It’s a crocheted Easter Basket that’s just the right size for American Girl® dolls. I love to teach anything about crocheting and I will teach you how to stiffen this basket.

A Crocheted Easter Basket for American Girl® Dolls

 

This basket was made with chain stitch, single crochet, double crochet and treble crochet using Aunt Lydia’s crochet thread, Size 10, in a color called “Copper Mist”. Some people are intimidated about crocheting with thread instead of yarn…but the stitches are the same…just on a smaller scale. This basket has had a special treatment that wasn’t possible 100 years ago: it’s been stiffened with a product called Stiffy. You can get it at any craft store and it’s made exactly for this purpose. It makes the crochet work very stiff so that it feels like a real basket and holds its shape. I’ll teach you my method here. I used an orange for a mold. The Kitchen People gave it to me!

Supplies:
Stiffy fabric stiffener
1 orange that fits inside your basket
plastic wrap
1 twist tie
small glass bowl
1 clothes pin

1. Find an orange that is a snug fit for your crocheted basket. The handle should just fit over the top of the orange.
2. Wrap the orange tightly in plastic wrap. Secure with a twist tie.
3. Pour Stiffy in a glass bowl, enough to cover your needlework.
4. Use your hands to work the Stiffy into the crochet cotton until it is saturated. The Stiffy is water soluble and will easily wash off of your hands.
5. Place the wrapped orange into the basket. Position the handle at the center top and press lower half of basket into shape around the orange. Shape the bottom rim as you like.
6. Hang your work to dry using a clothes pin on the excess plastic wrap. Allow it to dry overnight.
7. Carefully cut away the top portion of the orange, just enough so that the orange will slip out of the basket. Use care not to cut through the basket handle. Remove the orange.

Note.– The Easter Basket is made from the Crocheted Flower Basket pattern in The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book 100th Anniversary Edition.

Crow Shay here. I’ve been itching to crochet and I told Mary Frances we should make something orange and brown for one of her American Girl Dolls since Fall is here and Halloween is around the corner. Mary Frances thought her doll, Emily, needed a new sweater and that a cardigan would be a nice layering piece. I called out to Wooley Ball to fetch the yarn and when he found it, I went to town crocheting up a storm! That sweater was done in no time flat so I decided to surprise Mary Frances by making a matching hat. She loved it! Mary Frances had learned how to make Pom Poms in The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book 100th Anniversary Edition, so she made a cute multi-colored Pom Pom and added it to one side of the hat. Angelina is now one happy doll!

 

Mary Frances’ American Girl Doll, Emily, wearing a crocheted sweater and hat made from patterns in The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book 100th Anniversary Edition: A Children’s Story-Instruction Book with Doll Clothes Patterns for American Girl and Other 18-inch Dolls.

 This is the Crocheted Sports Sweater (Chapter 37) and Little Crocheted Hat (Chapter 33) made from Caron Simply Soft yarn.

 

Mary Frances here. The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book is very dear to me because I get such joy out of knitting and crocheting. I owe it all to the Knitting People who taught me how to do needlework: Yarn Baby, Wooley Ball, Crow Shay, Knit, Knack, and a beautiful fairy named Fairly Flew. These wonderful friends taught me to crochet and knit by making doll clothes. It was a great way to learn because the garments are small—and because my dolls now have lots of beautiful, handmade clothes! Aunt Maria thought it was high time I learned needlework and now she is so proud of me. I’m constantly amazed that I can make such things from a simple strand of yarn!

I’m so excited to tell you about The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book 100th Anniversary Edition: A Children’s Story-Instruction Book with Doll Clothes Patterns for American Girl and Other 18-inch Dolls! This special anniversary edition has been completely updated for the 21st century. All of the clothing has been scaled to fit American Girl® dolls and other 18-inch dolls of today. The yarns, hooks and needles are current. There are more than 40 beautiful patterns in this book and it’s now easy for present-day people to enjoy them. Knitwear is so classic in style that these garments are just as stylish today as they were 100 years ago!

Here’s a Show-and-Tell of clothes I crocheted and knitted for my American Girl dolls!

My dolls, Angelina, Emily and Mary Marie are modeling some of their clothes!

American Girl® doll clothes made from The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book 100th Anniversary Edition

The Mary Frances Knitting and Crocheting Book at Amazon.com

 

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For more details about this book, please click on the book cover to go to Amazon.com!